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Thread: Israel?

  1. #321
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    Re: Israel?

    I realise as I read my last post back that I miss spoke (or miss typed) badly. I said Hamas casualties when I meant Palestinian casualties, If the casualties were Hamas I wouldn't have a problem with it.
    Yeah, I noticed that and it struck me as a little strange. But I wasn't in the mood to start a debate about it. Not that we are prone to do that.

  2. #322
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    Re: Israel?

    Brain fart. It happens at my age
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  3. #323
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    Re: Israel?

    The problem is deeper than people seem to believe, or at least admit.

    Poland just SHOCKED the world, and NATO and EU globalists are furious


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    Re: Israel?

    I'm not sure I see the relevance to a thread on Israel and Palestine but hey ho.

    The last round of EU elections didn't go well for the EU but this video is really just hyperbole (and nothing at all to do with NATO which is an entirely separate body). All the European nations have a habit of sending anti EU candidates to be EU MPs mainly because there's very low engagement from the populations at large. The only people who get enthused about the EU elections are those that are strongly anti but that doesn't make them a majority, they're just the only people who can be bothered to vote. This is highly unlikely to translate to anyone leaving. Poland, in particular, is very strongly pro EU and has benefitted hugely since it joined - arguably more than any other member. I was living with a Polish girl a couple of years ago and have several Polish friends - the support is universal among them.

    Hell, even the UK is looking increasingly like it might rejoin at some point in the future. The two major parties still aren't talking about it because it's a pretty toxic subject but it's widely recognised that leaving was a disaster and every poll now shows that support to rejoin outstrips the desire to carry on as we are. The EU's not going anywhere.

    I do think NATO is under threat if Trump wins the next presidency but I'm not convinced American withdrawal would actually spell the end of the alliance. Whether it would simply continue without the US or whether it would be replaced with a new treaty I'm not sure but, in Military terms, European sentiment is more unified in the wake of the Russian attack on Ukraine than it has been for decades. Previously neutral nations are joining or seeking to join so I don't see the European arm of the alliance going anywhere - no matter what the Pro Putin Twitterati would like.

    Other than that, I'm still waiting for anyone to give me a definition for "Globalist" that wouldn't, in the past, have been ascribed to the Illuminati, the New World Order, Lizard People or Jews. It's a term without meaning and really nothing more than a bogeyman. And as for the "Ukrainianization of Poland"... I mean, just, what?
    Last edited by FunkyDexter; Jun 20th, 2024 at 08:14 AM.
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  5. #325
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by FunkyDexter View Post
    I'm not sure I see the relevance to a thread on Israel and Palestine but hey ho.

    The last round of EU elections didn't go well for the EU but this video is really just hyperbole (and nothing at all to do with NATO which is an entirely separate body). All the European nations have a habit of sending anti EU candidates to be EU MPs mainly because there's very low engagement from the populations at large. The only people who get enthused about the EU are those that are strongly anti but that doesn't make them a majority, they're just the only people who can be bothered to vote. This is highly unlikely to translate to anyone leaving. Poland, in particular, is very strongly pro EU and has benefitted hugely since it joined - arguably more than any other member. I was living with a Polish girl a couple of years ago and have several Polish friends - the support is universal among them.

    Hell, even the UK is looking increasingly like it might rejoin at some point in the future. The two major parties still aren't talking about it because it's a pretty toxic subject but it's widely recognised that leaving was a disaster and every poll now shows that support to rejoin outstrips the desire to carry on as we are. The EU's not going anywhere.

    I do think NATO is under threat if Trump wins the next presidency but I'm not convinced American withdrawal would actually spell the end of the alliance. Whether it would simply continue without the US or whether it would be replaced with a new treaty I'm not sure but, in Military terms, European sentiment is more unified in the wake of the Russian attack on Ukraine than it has been for decades. Previously neutral nations are joining or seeking to join so I don't see the European arm of the alliance going anywhere - no matter what the Pro Putin Twitterati would like.

    Other than that, I'm still waiting for anyone to give me a definition for "Globalist" that wouldn't, in the past, have been ascribed to the Illuminati, the New World Order, Lizard People or Jews. It's a term without meaning and really nothing more than a bogeyman. And as for the "Ukrainianization of Poland"... I mean, just, what?
    I'm surprised you even bothered to look at it...given the history of what he posts links to.
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  6. #326
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    Re: Israel?

    Considering the tensions that the West Bank Israeli expansions has caused over the decades, it's seems like a bad time for such a large (or any) expansion plan. https://apnews.com/a-look-at-how-set...da79dcbd0a0000

    Makes me question if Israel wants peace.

  7. #327
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    Re: Israel?

    Large parts of Israel probably wants peace, but significant parts of the current government most definitely do NOT want peace.
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  8. #328
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    Large parts of Israel probably wants peace, but significant parts of the current government most definitely do NOT want peace.
    That may be true. I haven't seen any information on how much of the Israeli population is for or against the government actions. Have you?

  9. #329
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    Re: Israel?

    No, but to be fair, I haven't looked, or even considered trying to look. I feel that everything that is happening comes down to Netanyahu trying to cling to power. He can't lose any part of his coalition, which means the fringe parties can steer him whichever way they like, and they are. Therefore, the direction of Israel, until the government falls, is being driven by a small minority. What portion of Israel doesn't want this situation almost doesn't matter.
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  10. #330
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    Re: Israel?

    Therefore, the direction of Israel, until the government falls, is being driven by a small minority. What portion of Israel doesn't want this situation almost doesn't matter.
    How can it not matter. Netanyahu only has the power that the people of Israel give him. The problems in the West bank and Gaza has been going on for many many years and through many elections.

    But it would be interesting to know how the majority of Israeli's feel about the current actions. It's hard to guess, they live in a completely different environment than we do. Attacks on there country are a part of daily life.
    Last edited by wes4dbt; Jul 6th, 2024 at 12:46 PM.

  11. #331
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    Re: Israel?

    Until the government falls, he's the leader as the head of the government. I feel that the people of Israel have definitely moved in a different direction since he was last elected, as it seems very unlikely that they would elect him again, at this point. If Israel goes into Lebanon, remains in Gaza, decides to use mushrooms en masse, is largely up to a government that would be very unlikely to remain in power if they were to face an election today. Therefore, the government doesn't reflect the will of the people, currently, and the will of the people is not directing Israel, therefore, they are somewhat irrelevant...until the election, whenever that is.
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  12. #332
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    Re: Israel?

    Therefore, the government doesn't reflect the will of the people, currently, and the will of the people is not directing Israel, therefore, they are somewhat irrelevant...until the election, whenever that is.
    That's basically true of most governments, "currently" is controlled by the government. But the will of the people elected the current government. Why assume they are against the government actions? "Large parts of Israel probably wants peace". I've seen some protests but nothing that would lead me to believe the majority was against the government actions. I was hoping you had more insight. I'm to lazy to research it. lol

    I remember @ a couple of years ago there were several elections in Israel. I didn't understand that, I'm used to the US with fixed election dates. Not sure what triggers elections in Israel.
    Last edited by wes4dbt; Jul 6th, 2024 at 02:21 PM.

  13. #333
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    Re: Israel?

    I feel that this case is somewhat different because of the attack in October and the fallout. That may not be correct, as every government will face circumstances that didn't exist when they were elected, though not usually as extreme as this one. In Israel, the government is supposed to protect the people. That may be true everywhere to some extent, but I think it is a more immediate concern in that country. They singularly failed to do so, which would not be popular, but screwing up isn't new to government, either. The thing is that I feel the response by the Israeli government is more botched than most responses I have seen in a long time.

    Netanyahu had plenty of detractors prior to the Hamas attack. Since that time, I feel that he has diverged from the best interests of the country more than most leaders tend to do. It's just a feeling about it, though. They get different news than we get, and might support his actions more than I do.
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  14. #334
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    Re: Israel?

    Netanyahu had plenty of detractors prior to the Hamas attack. Since that time, I feel that he has diverged from the best interests of the country more than most leaders tend to do. It's just a feeling about it, though. They get different news than we get, and might support his actions more than I do.
    Yeah, it's hard to say. I have no experience living in that type of environment. Imagine, never knowing peace, living your entire life in the middle of violent conflict. That could definitely effect what you consider reasonable behavior. The violence probably has touched the majority of people, either directly or indirectly through a family member or friend.

    Well, now that I think about it, I lived with my Dad for 17yrs so I do have an idea what it's like to live in a violent environment. Living with that guy was like living in a mine field. That's why moving out when I was 17 seemed like reasonable behavior.

  15. #335
    Super Moderator FunkyDexter's Avatar
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    Re: Israel?

    Netanyahu only has the power that the people of Israel give him.
    I think some pedantry's required to understand this. He only had that power immediately prior to and after the last election. Since then he's had the power afforded to him by whoever can force (or choose not to force) a re-election and that's not the electorate. I won't pretend I really know who that is but I took a look at Wikipedia and it seems like it's majority of the Knesset or by Netanyahu himself. He's not going to call one himself so all he's got to do is keep the Knesset (who currently have a very strong ultra orthodox and far right slant) on side so don't hold your breath. That said, he recently called for conscription to be extended to the Ultra Orthodox community who are currently exempt and they're up in arms so he could well lose the support of that part of the Knesset which might bring him down.

    As for the proportion of Israeli's that support or oppose the actions in Gaza, it's a struggle to find anything reliable. I did a search that found some early polls that showed roughly two thirds support it so that's a very significant majority but I've also seen lots of anecdotal news articles that say that the support has been declining ever since. I'm not sure whether that declination is due to sympathy for Palestinians or because the actions have been largely ineffective with the only significant release of hostages coming from diplomacy during a pause in fighting. Notably the families of the hostages have come out strongly against the actions which is interesting as you might expect them to support it.
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  16. #336
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    Re: Israel?

    I think some pedantry's required to understand this
    Not really. My statement is not about who can force an election or what power an elected official has. It's really not complicated.

    The "people of Israel" designed their laws of government, they elect their representatives. So they gave them their power. All of these things are subject to change if there is enough will to do so.

    I have this same sort of disagreement with people here about labor Unions. My daughter complains her union sucks and I tell her it's the members fault. Luckily she likes me anyway. I think???

  17. #337
    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
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    Re: Israel?

    My understanding of Israel is that it's a lot shakier than most stable countries. There's no founding document to give them even a fig leaf of cover, the branches of government have no clearly defined roles (though the US shows that those roles shift even when defined), and they have two significant and insurmountable fault lines running through the heart of their country.

    The first fault line is the Jewish/Palestine divide. If Israel simply annexed the West Bank while absorbing the current residents, that would mean that the Jewish population would be almost a minority (it would be close). As it is, there is a significant Arab or Palestinian population in Israel itself, though not enough to vote as a majority. This is made worse by the Palestinians having a higher birth rate than Israelis.

    The second fault line is the secular/ultra-orthodox divide (not sure about orthodox vs ultra-orthodox). Secular Israel is highly educated and technologically accomplished. They pay taxes, serve in the military, and have produced many technological improvements both good and bad. None of that can be said of the ultra-orthodox, who are poorly educated, pay negative taxes (they get a fair number of subsidies), don't serve in the military, and so forth. However, the ultra-orthodox do reproduce, and do so at a rate that keeps up with the Palestinians.

    I would think that those fault lines would mean that Israel is always an experiment on the verge of falling over.
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    Re: Israel?

    and they have two significant and insurmountable fault lines running through the heart of their country.
    From your description these fault lines seem to be based in inequality. Something the US is very familiar with. I believe we've made progress(slow progress), why don't you think they can?

  19. #339
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    Re: Israel?

    I think the issue is more demographics than inequality. Sure, there's inequality, but there's also reproduction. There are three populations, the secular state, the ultra-orthodox, and the Palestinians. The latter two are reproducing at a rate such that they are growing. The secular population was reproducing below the replacement rate, though I'm not sure whether or not they still are. I think they are, I just heard something that suggested that perhaps not anymore.

    What does progress look like in that case? One of those groups would like to at least undermine the concept of Israel as it now stands (a Jewish state), while the other one of those groups sure seems like it takes without giving, to me. There may well be more to it than that, but I haven't heard about it. My understanding is that the ultra-orthodox are essentially supported by the taxes paid by the rest, as they generally don't get an education outside of religious teachings, don't usually work in a productive way, and receive what amounts to welfare for sustenance.

    If that's right, then the status quo would eventually lead to the dissolution of the state of Israel as it now stands. That wouldn't be the first time, for that piece of land, either. Israel hasn't been around all that long in it's current incarnation. Christians ruled Palestine for longer than the modern state of Israel has been around, though the current state will likely last longer than Christians did over there. Saladin took Jerusalem just less than a century after the first crusade, and the Franks held on to at least a bit of the land for another 60-80 years.

    It's a turbulent place.
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  20. #340
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    I think the issue is more demographics than inequality. Sure, there's inequality, but there's also reproduction. There are three populations, the secular state, the ultra-orthodox, and the Palestinians. The latter two are reproducing at a rate such that they are growing. The secular population was reproducing below the replacement rate, though I'm not sure whether or not they still are. I think they are, I just heard something that suggested that perhaps not anymore.

    What does progress look like in that case? One of those groups would like to at least undermine the concept of Israel as it now stands (a Jewish state), while the other one of those groups sure seems like it takes without giving, to me. There may well be more to it than that, but I haven't heard about it. My understanding is that the ultra-orthodox are essentially supported by the taxes paid by the rest, as they generally don't get an education outside of religious teachings, don't usually work in a productive way, and receive what amounts to welfare for sustenance.

    If that's right, then the status quo would eventually lead to the dissolution of the state of Israel as it now stands. That wouldn't be the first time, for that piece of land, either. Israel hasn't been around all that long in it's current incarnation. Christians ruled Palestine for longer than the modern state of Israel has been around, though the current state will likely last longer than Christians did over there. Saladin took Jerusalem just less than a century after the first crusade, and the Franks held on to at least a bit of the land for another 60-80 years.

    It's a turbulent place.
    It seems to have Italy beat...
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  21. #341
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    I think the issue is more demographics than inequality. Sure, there's inequality, but there's also reproduction. There are three populations, the secular state, the ultra-orthodox, and the Palestinians. The latter two are reproducing at a rate such that they are growing. The secular population was reproducing below the replacement rate, though I'm not sure whether or not they still are. I think they are, I just heard something that suggested that perhaps not anymore.

    What does progress look like in that case? One of those groups would like to at least undermine the concept of Israel as it now stands (a Jewish state), while the other one of those groups sure seems like it takes without giving, to me. There may well be more to it than that, but I haven't heard about it. My understanding is that the ultra-orthodox are essentially supported by the taxes paid by the rest, as they generally don't get an education outside of religious teachings, don't usually work in a productive way, and receive what amounts to welfare for sustenance.

    If that's right, then the status quo would eventually lead to the dissolution of the state of Israel as it now stands. That wouldn't be the first time, for that piece of land, either. Israel hasn't been around all that long in it's current incarnation. Christians ruled Palestine for longer than the modern state of Israel has been around, though the current state will likely last longer than Christians did over there. Saladin took Jerusalem just less than a century after the first crusade, and the Franks held on to at least a bit of the land for another 60-80 years.

    It's a turbulent place.
    I wonder how they justify how the government treats the secular/ultra-orthodox differently. It's amazing the things we humans can convince ourselves are acceptable.

  22. #342
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    Re: Israel?

    The "people of Israel" designed their laws of government, they elect their representatives. So they gave them their power.
    I agree they gave them power but I don't think you can jump from there to concluding that they are responsible for and/or support the current conflict. The last election happened before October 7th and ensuing response. Those things weren't on anyone's radar at the time of the last election and, although Netanyahu did run on a "security and protection" ticket (my words, not his), at the time that looked like maintaining a border wall and missile defence shield - nothing more. The responsibility for Israel's current actions sits with the Knesset. What I do think you can hold the electorate responsible for was electing a far right, ultra orthodox and bellicose government. I also think you can hold them responsible for electing a government which pursues an ongoing policy of oppression and illegal settlement in agreed Palestinian territory. I'm certainly not going to support or defend them in either of those.

    If you want to examine whether the electorate support the conflict or not then all you can really look at is the polls I cited in post 335 which are probably less than reliable but indicate that roughly two thirds do and it's declining.

    I wonder how they justify how the government treats the secular/ultra-orthodox differently
    It goes back to the holocaust and the founding of the modern state. There was a genuine fear that Judaism, particularly a deep understanding of the Torah, could be wiped out in a future persecution. Israel, as the sole Jewish state in the world, saw it as their responsibility to keep those things alive and instituted a system that would incentivise young men to study the Torah. I'm not religious but I think that was probably fairly reasonable at the time from a cultural point of view if nothing else. Trouble is that, at the time, it represented a couple of percent of the population but has since grown to be in the low teens (I found 12.9% with a quick google but not sure how recent or accurate that is) and still rising.

    Pedantry: it's worth mentioning that being Ultra Orthodox doesn't necessarily equate to being Haredi (who are the guys who receive welfare, are exempted from military service etc.) and that doesn't necessarily equate to actively studying the Torah but these groups do overwhelmingly corelate.

    As it is, there is a significant Arab or Palestinian population in Israel itself, though not enough to vote as a majority.
    If you're defining Israel as the territory including the West Bank and Gaza (i.e. everything that would be subsumed into a single state solution) then the Muslims would be the majority by a substantial majority. If you're defining it as not including the West Bank or the Gaza strip then the Jews would still be a substantial majority. (I use Jews and Muslims because I suspect any voting divide would largely fall along religious lines although there is a lit more nuance underlying it than that.)
    Last edited by FunkyDexter; Jul 11th, 2024 at 01:34 PM.
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  23. #343
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    Re: Israel?

    I was only talking about the minority Arab population of Israel. The state has a real issue if they annex and assimilate the West Bank and Gaza. They have a different problem if they annex the land and not the residents of the land, but they have a real problem either way.

    Israel was pretty closely divided in the last election...or the last several. The country was so evenly split that they had to keep voting over and over because neither side could gain a sufficient majority. I doubt that would be the case if a vote were held today.
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  24. #344
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    Re: Israel?

    I doubt that would be the case if a vote were held today.
    Agreed and that's perhaps the most sinister part about all this. Netanyahu will do anything to avoid an election now and that might well involve the second problem you hinted at (assuming I'm reading you right). I think he takes the view that a Gaza without Palestinians would be more convenient. I think, so far, he's stopped short of pursuing that to it's ultimate conclusion


    Just in case it matters: For accuracy I made a slight edit to my last post and changed "future conflict" to "future persecution" and added the bit about holding the electorate responsible for an ongoing policy of settlement and oppression. I don't think it changes the meaning but mentioning it just in case it looks weird that I changed it.
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    Re: Israel?

    I agree they gave them power but I don't think you can jump from there to concluding that they are responsible for and/or support the current conflict.
    I also think you can hold them responsible for electing a government which pursues an ongoing policy of oppression and illegal settlement in agreed Palestinian territory. I'm certainly not going to support or defend them in either of those.
    If you want to examine whether the electorate support the conflict or not then all you can really look at is the polls I cited in post 335 which are probably less than reliable but indicate that roughly two thirds do and it's declining.
    Your trying to have it both ways. They're not responsible, they are responsible, 2/3 support the conflict. lol

    At least we agree the people of Israel gave their representatives the power. In this case, Netanyahu has been around for a long time and is a well know commodity. So what he's doing can't be a big surprise. He was their choice. But more importantly is if the people of Israel want to stop the current actions, it's their responsibility to do so. So far the majority has been silent.

    So far I've seen nothing to support saying the current Gaza and West Bank actions are because of a rogue government and are not what the majority of Israeli's want.

    It goes back to the holocaust and the founding of the modern state. There was a genuine fear that Judaism, particularly a deep understanding of the Torah, could be wiped out in a future persecution. Israel, as the sole Jewish state in the world, saw it as their responsibility to keep those things alive and instituted a system that would incentivise young men to study the Torah. I'm not religious but I think that was probably fairly reasonable at the time from a cultural point of view if nothing else. Trouble is that, at the time, it represented a couple of percent of the population but has since grown to be in the low teens (I found 12.9% with a quick google but not sure how recent or accurate that is) and still rising.
    That's interesting, thanks.

    It may sound like I'm anti Israel, I'm not. The whole area is a mess and has been for 70+ years. But if you elect a known thief then you can't act surprised when he steals.
    Last edited by wes4dbt; Jul 11th, 2024 at 02:40 PM.

  26. #346
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    Re: Israel?

    He was there choice in a different time, back when they believed that the government would keep them safe from terrorist incursions. As for the support, I'd say that following something like the October attack, the support for a response would be VERY high, probably well above two thirds. I also think that local news in Israel is painting a different picture from what we are seeing.

    It's a pretty dynamic shift. I have no idea where it stands at now.
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  27. #347
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    He was there choice in a different time, back when they believed that the government would keep them safe from terrorist incursions. As for the support, I'd say that following something like the October attack, the support for a response would be VERY high, probably well above two thirds. I also think that local news in Israel is painting a different picture from what we are seeing.

    It's a pretty dynamic shift. I have no idea where it stands at now.
    Your post made me wonder if Israel has a free press, so I Google "Is Israeli press censored" and got this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censor...07%20operation.

    I'm not convinced that this is a "different time". It's definitely more open and extreme at this moment but this conflict has been never ending. The Gaza and West Bank issues aren't new. It's been, you hit me and I hit you back since I can remember and before that.

    It's understandable why both sides devalue the lives of the other. Neither side seems interested in peace, only victory. A lot smarter people than me have tried to establish peace and have failed. Like I said it's a mess. Earlier you said it's a turbulent place, that seems like an understatement but I don't have a better description.

    Edit - Since it's gonna be 110 outside today I decided to stay inside and drone on about this. lol

    At this time I do have a good amount of sympathy for the Palestinians. It's my understanding they didn't freely elect Hama but are being punished for their actions. But my knowledge of the situation is very superficial.
    Last edited by wes4dbt; Jul 11th, 2024 at 04:07 PM.

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    Re: Israel?

    Your trying to have it both ways.
    I'm really not. I'm simply drawing distinctions which I think are important. Settlement and oppression (which is the worst you can really say the Israeli electorate actually voted for) are bad enough and I've vocally oppose them for years. But they're not in the same league as the actions that have been carried out since October 7th. Those actions have already risen to the standard of Ethnic Cleansing and have the hallmarks of a Genocide in progress.

    I'm making those distinctions for the same reason I previously made the distinction between supporters of the conflict and "Israelis". Because if you don't make those distinctions you risk accusing a set of people that contains a significant minority of holocaust survivors and an overwhelming majority of relatives of holocaust survivors of being responsible for genocide. I get that you don't think that's important and that I'm virtue signalling for pointing it out but I do think it's important and I don't think it's virtue signalling. It hits very differently to "Americans are overweight", "English people have bad teeth" and "Women be shopping".

    If an Israeli is responsible for genocide I believe it is legitimate to call them out and accuse them of that. It would be a moral failing not to. But I think it is incumbent on us to make sure we are levelling that accusation at the right Israelis and that we are accusing them of the right thing. You may differ - you have that right, but don't expect me to.

    To be clear, I don't think you're being racist or antisemitic. I don't even think you're being particularly "anti Israel". But I don't think you've really appreciated how sensitive a subject this is and why. Sorry.

    It's my understanding they didn't freely elect Hama
    They did but it was back in 2006 and Hamas have refused to hold an election since so I feel like your underlying point stands. I don't think that election should still be regarded as a legitimate mandate.

    edit>
    I'd say that following something like the October attack, the support for a response would be VERY high
    I agree with this. Think back to the atmosphere in he US immediately after 9/11. The things being posted on this forum didn't seem interested in identifying who was actually responsible. I remember one person advocating that we should reduce the Muslim world to glass and I don't believe they were being deliberately hyperbolic.
    Last edited by FunkyDexter; Jul 12th, 2024 at 09:57 AM.
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  29. #349
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    I'm not convinced that this is a "different time". It's definitely more open and extreme at this moment but this conflict has been never ending. The Gaza and West Bank issues aren't new. It's been, you hit me and I hit you back since I can remember and before that.
    Yeah, I didn't mean it quite like that, thought I did say it quite like that. I meant that post-October attack is a different time than the last election, which wasn't all that far back. During the election, I would expect that the vast majority of Israelis felt that they had to worry about missiles being fired by Hamas, suicide bombers, uprisings, and possible attacks from Hezbollah, but I would expect that they didn't think that Hamas would be able to drive into the country and kill a thousand people. I feel that they believed the government was on top of large-scale maneuver attacks of that sort. They were worried about small, spontaneous attacks that are both hard to predict and hard to prevent, but not worried about large scale attacks. Now, they don't know what the government can keep them safe from.

    So, when I was talking about a different time, I just mean that they had their minds changed about the nature of the threat.
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    Re: Israel?

    I'm making those distinctions for the same reason I previously made the distinction between supporters of the conflict and "Israelis".
    Yeah, some how you've convinced yourself that the people that live in Israel and support the conflict are not Israelis. lol

    Your justifications have gotten weird. Throwing in holocaust survivors. Saying you shouldn't use the term Israeli because there is a subset that doesn't support the conflict. Of course there is, no reasonable person would believe everyone in Israel supports the governments actions. ON ANYTHING THEY DO.

    I get that you don't think that's important and that I'm virtue signalling for pointing it out
    I've never used the term "virtue signaling" in my life. lol

    What I think is your trying to justify your position with a lot of irrelevant reasons.

    Israel is responsible for the actions in Gaza, just as the US was responsible for invading Afghanistan after 9/11.

    You may differ - you have that right, but don't expect me to.
    I don't expect you to change your position.

  31. #351
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    Re: Israel?

    Yeah, some how you've convinced yourself that the people that live in Israel and support the conflict are not Israelis.
    No and I suspect that's a deliberate misread of what I've posted. Acknowledging that a significant portion of Israelis do not support a position is not the same as asserting that Israelis aren't Israelis.

    I've never used the term "virtue signaling" in my life. lol
    you turned a simple point made by SH into a chance for you to wrap yourself in the flag of righteousness and justify it by reliving the horrors of the holocaust
    Hard to see how else this would be taken.

    If you cannot see how explicitly accusing a set of people that include holocaust survivors and their relatives of being responsible for ethnic cleansing and, arguably, genocide without making any effort to differentiate those who do and don't even support that let alone have voted for it (which literally nobody did) is problematic then I guess I can't help you see it. But it doesn't paint you in a good light.

    I feel I've tried to engage with you and explain my position in good faith and have gone out of my way to avoid offence while doing so. I don't feel that is reciprocated.
    Last edited by FunkyDexter; Jul 12th, 2024 at 01:24 PM.
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  32. #352
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    Re: Israel?

    So, when I was talking about a different time, I just mean that they had their minds changed about the nature of the threat.
    Yeah, it had been a long time since there was a large scale conflict. Seems strange that missiles and suicide bombers are part of daily life. I have a hard time understanding why it's never ending. Why they can't come to some sort of peace agreement. Just about any peace agreement would probably be better than what they got now. My only answer is there's to many years of scarring. Fighting against the "other side" is like part of their DNA.

  33. #353
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    Re: Israel?

    No and I suspect that's a deliberate misread of what I've posted. Acknowledging that a significant portion of Israelis do not support a position is not the same as asserting that Israelis aren't Israelis
    No this is a complete misrepresentation. I've never said all Israelis support the conflict, I've said I don't know how much of the population supports the conflict(many times). I've never refused to acknowledge there are Israelis that don't support the conflict.

    You really disappoint me.

  34. #354
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    Re: Israel?

    you turned a simple point made by SH into a chance for you to wrap yourself in the flag of righteousness and justify it by reliving the horrors of the holocaust
    Like I said, I've never used to term "virtue signaling" . I didn't say you haven't done it. lol

  35. #355
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    Re: Israel?

    I feel I've tried to engage with you and explain my position in good faith and have gone out of my way to avoid offence while doing so. I don't feel that is reciprocated.
    I'm not trying to offend you. Let's just let it go, because I'm also getting offended after your last post. I'm done.

  36. #356
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    Yeah, it had been a long time since there was a large scale conflict. Seems strange that missiles and suicide bombers are part of daily life. I have a hard time understanding why it's never ending. Why they can't come to some sort of peace agreement. Just about any peace agreement would probably be better than what they got now. My only answer is there's to many years of scarring. Fighting against the "other side" is like part of their DNA.
    Why can't they come to some sort of a peace agreement? Because large parts of both sides don't want one. The Palestinians were pushed off their land by the formation of Israel, while there's a powerful segment within Israel that wants to push them out of Gaza and the West Bank, as well. Those people would have to give up what they want for there to be peace. The formation of Israel isn't all that long ago, either, so there are people alive who still remember it. Of course, there is probably no more blood-soaked patch of earth than Jerusalem and the lands around it, but the current grievances are fairly current.
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  37. #357
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    Why can't they come to some sort of a peace agreement? Because large parts of both sides don't want one. The Palestinians were pushed off their land by the formation of Israel, while there's a powerful segment within Israel that wants to push them out of Gaza and the West Bank, as well. Those people would have to give up what they want for there to be peace. The formation of Israel isn't all that long ago, either, so there are people alive who still remember it. Of course, there is probably no more blood-soaked patch of earth than Jerusalem and the lands around it, but the current grievances are fairly current.
    I don't disagree with that assessment. I just don't understand why they don't want peace after the harm 75yrs of conflict has caused. To me there motivations don't justify the ability for the people to lead quality lives.

    Of course maybe that's because I have a hard time understanding wars in general. They're usually for the "good of the people" but the people are the ones doing all the dying. To me, there's not much that's worth dying for, maybe my kids but even that's not a given. lol

  38. #358
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    I don't disagree with that assessment. I just don't understand why they don't want peace after the harm 75yrs of conflict has caused. To me there motivations don't justify the ability for the people to lead quality lives.

    Of course maybe that's because I have a hard time understanding wars in general. They're usually for the "good of the people" but the people are the ones doing all the dying. To me, there's not much that's worth dying for, maybe my kids but even that's not a given. lol
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  39. #359
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    Re: Israel?

    Quote Originally Posted by wes4dbt View Post
    I don't disagree with that assessment. I just don't understand why they don't want peace after the harm 75yrs of conflict has caused. To me there motivations don't justify the ability for the people to lead quality lives.

    Of course maybe that's because I have a hard time understanding wars in general. They're usually for the "good of the people" but the people are the ones doing all the dying. To me, there's not much that's worth dying for, maybe my kids but even that's not a given. lol
    Well, the people pushing for them think that they'll win, and possibly win with ease. It's a particular kind of myopia. I was always struck by that statement by Leroy Pope Walker that all the blood spilled by the southern secession could be mopped up with a handkerchief. Turns out, it would have taken one BIG handkerchief to mop up all that blood, but Leroy honestly believed what he said. Those kinds of miscalculations tend to underlie all wars. Just look at Ukraine. Would Putin have gone in there if he had known how it would go? Probably not.
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    Re: Israel?

    I've never said all Israelis support the conflict
    And I haven't said that you did. I've said that you fail to make an important distinction (actually, two important distinctions) and explained why they are important.

    Let's just let it go
    As you wish but one piece of advice. When asking someone to "let it go" it's a bad idea to insult them:-
    Like I said, I've never used to term "virtue signaling" . I didn't say you haven't done it. lol
    That makes you look disingenuous, at best. lol.

    I just don't understand why they don't want peace after the harm 75yrs of conflict has caused.
    Because the people actually responsible for this have a vested interest in ongoing conflict. If peace breaks out Hamas cease to have a purpose and therefore cease exist and Netanyahu faces an election that he will almost certainly lose and he will very likely face corruption charges. This conflict is not about Israelis and Palestinians. It's not even about Jews and Muslims. It's about people who have power and are willing to throw people who don't have power under the wheels to hold on to that power.
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