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Thread: Quietly quitting

  1. #1

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    Quietly quitting

    https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Living/bu...ry?id=88399001

    On a weekly basis I'm finding myself of "quietly quitting". I get up from my desk and straighten out around the house, maybe go to the store, watch some TV. More and more I need to force myself to sit and do the really tedious work. A big part of it is over two years of working from home breaking 35 years of office routine. Another factor is I'm very close to retiring, due to age more the being financially secure.

    We are three weeks into merging a competitor into our IT systems and it has been going badly. People around me are working horrendous hours and I am not. Now those folks want to work another twenty years or so and buckle done. I'm embarrassed to say it but I may have gone ROAD (retired on active duty).

    On the flip side it is nice if you can do it. I don't even have an office to go to anymore.
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    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I'm almost in the same boat, except that I write programs and enjoy doing so, which means that I goof off by working...which is weird. I've been putting off a minor improvement to a program that I SHOULD be working on in favor of significant work on a program that likely won't benefit anybody. I'm also close to retirement, and cash isn't the biggest issue. Far bigger is the fact that it's not clear what I have to do. I maintain half a dozen programs, or more (I guess I haven't really counted). When they aren't working, it's an emergency, but when they are working...well, then what? I have another project possibly starting up around the beginning of October, but it's all very vague.

    In any case, I'm certainly eyeing the door. I passed early retirement while hiking (it was sitting off in the woods, for some reason), and every month makes a noticeable difference in retirement. Just a matter of the when...and insurance.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    Quote Originally Posted by Shaggy Hiker View Post
    I'm almost in the same boat, except that I write programs and enjoy doing so, which means that I goof off by working...which is weird. I've been putting off a minor improvement to a program that I SHOULD be working on in favor of significant work on a program that likely won't benefit anybody. I'm also close to retirement, and cash isn't the biggest issue. Far bigger is the fact that it's not clear what I have to do. I maintain half a dozen programs, or more (I guess I haven't really counted). When they aren't working, it's an emergency, but when they are working...well, then what? I have another project possibly starting up around the beginning of October, but it's all very vague.

    In any case, I'm certainly eyeing the door. I passed early retirement while hiking (it was sitting off in the woods, for some reason), and every month makes a noticeable difference in retirement. Just a matter of the when...and insurance.
    I've been on full social security for almost two years...I like the extra cash.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I won't qualify for full SS benefits until sometime next year. Right now I'm hoping the stock market falls to a point where it will be cheap enough to roll 401(k) assets over to Roth 401(k)s to avoid the RMD hammer that is coming. That presumes stocks will rise again down the road a couple of years. Of course there are also income tax hikes coming on very soon and that acts as another whip to get liquidation moving. I don't have anything in 457s.

    Taking SS at the same time as 401(k) distributions... looks dicey. That will easily shift me a whole tax bracket upward and a lot of it gets eaten up.

    Even when your deferred comp accounts are pretty modest it is galling to have so much of your retirement savings eaten up in taxes. But that's just more insult added to the injury of the new pension and 401(k) taxes levied here 10 years ago to provide State-level corporate welfare. They call it "bi-partisanship" because they all got rewarded by their donors.


    So just keep in mind that when you "retire" you get a new job: not going broke. I'm no Wall Street wizard but I really worry about people who haven't even kept up with doing their taxes. They are at the mercy of the "financial advisor" operators out there.

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    Re: Quietly quitting

    Not sure what is the retirement plan in US but in Greece we get a pension from the state.
    Used to be in the rates of 1000-1800 Euros but now due to the sold our dogs that are our politicians it went to 300-800 Euros.
    Anyhow, if I was to retire that is not and option for at least 30 years, I wouldn't have a problem living in the seashore as we have close to 6 months summer here.
    If I have saved some , even better, if not, I guess 3-500 is deeply low but again I don't know the US retirements plans.
    So in general fk jobs, you have worked enough, enjoy you retirements as best as you can without looking back.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I was in my 16th year with the same company that laid me off two weeks after I turned 62.

    I was planning on working till age 68... But I did six months of unemployment and eating up savings and decided to retire.... I goofed up by thinking I might do something else while draining my savings for another six months.

    I started collecting SS benefits at age 63.

    Quietly quitting - I can relate to the concept.... Way back when, putting in extra effort paid off. Now a days it's expected.... OH NO - I wouldn't do it..
    Wi-fi went down for five minutes, so I had to talk to my family....They seem like nice people.

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    Super Moderator dday9's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I don't understand the concept of quietly quitting in younger generations; the video said quietly quitting was popular amount young 20 year old's.

    I understand that work should not be your number 1 priority but I also recognized that short-term sacrifices are sometimes required in order to meet long-term goals. Then again, I have been a very goal oriented individual since I married (I was 20). So I guess I can understand it in the younger generations if, broadly speaking, they don't have clearly defined long-term goals.

    I completely understand it in older generations like yours Tyson. When you get to the age where you can retire but you continue to work to either satisfy an itch or to delay retirement to make it a bit more comfortable then it makes complete sense to quietly quit because your goals are not what they were when you were 20, 30, or even 40.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    With interest rates rising in many places, and a trickle of it being passed on to consumers... you might find this calculator of value:

    When to Break a CD Calculator

    Even better, take your lender's specific rules for your CD(s) and make a projection tool in Excel. That can show you more accurate figures and let you know what level new CD rates must rise to before it is worth breaking a CD and reinvesting in a new one.

    But online calculators (like the one at the link) can help you "sanity check" your hand-made Excel tool before you jump and make an expensive mistake, incurring penalties the new rate can't outweigh.

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    Re: Quietly quitting

    Worse yet: don't get "quietly laid off" as Milton did:


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    Super Moderator dday9's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    When inflation is 8.5% and the CD is yielding 1.5%, the answer to "when to break a CD" should be "right now".

    Not sure how this conversation is related to quietly quitting though.
    "Code is like humor. When you have to explain it, itís bad." - Cory House
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  11. #11
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    Quote Originally Posted by dday9 View Post
    I don't understand the concept of quietly quitting in younger generations; the video said quietly quitting was popular amount young 20 year old's.

    I understand that work should not be your number 1 priority but I also recognized that short-term sacrifices are sometimes required in order to meet long-term goals. Then again, I have been a very goal oriented individual since I married (I was 20). So I guess I can understand it in the younger generations if, broadly speaking, they don't have clearly defined long-term goals.
    The problem is that the long hours aren't a short-term deal anymore. Instead of it being out of the ordinary, it's become the norm - put in 8+ hrs a day. Everyday. All the time. If you put in your 8 hrs and no more, you're viewed as a slacker and not working - because everyone else is working 10 hr days.

    What's happened was a shift. 20 years ago, in a goup of 10 people, 1-2 would routinely stay extra hours. The other 8 head home.
    Today it's shifted to the reverse ... now 9 of those people are staying late, because it's the expected norm, while the one "quietly quits" and goes home after 8 hours.

    And I get it. I was at a job where it was expected that you would bill (we did consulting work) at least 6-8 hours a day. That doesn't include meetings (unless they were directly with the client) ... That meant often we were basically required to put in 10hr days... which is BS. Those that didn't, it showed up on performance eval reports. It's like that a scene in Office Space about "flair".

    Now... I'm in a better place. I can basically set my own hours. As long as I'm reasonably available between 9:30 and 3:30 I can start/finish the day when I want. I routinely do 8:30-4:30. When I commuted I set my hours from 7:30am to 3:30pm. And if I work extra hours, I can "flex" that time and take off early on a later day. There have been times when I'll rack up 4-6 hours extra, so I'll take off early a couple days.

    So, yeah, sometimes you may put in the extra hours, but that should be the exception, not the norm.


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    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I get paid hourly. I couldn't believe it, but now I understand it. Bean counters wanted to be able to count the beans accurately, and paying by the hour was counting accurately. That also means that beyond 40/week I get...something like overtime. It's not at time and a half, nor is it money, but it comes in the form of comp time. If you think that through, it ends up being total flex time. In the winters, I can work longer, cause what else would I do? Well, skiing, maybe, but it wasn't great last winter. In the summer, I can go hiking. Half of my five week hike this summer was not vacation time.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    The problem is that the long hours aren't a short-term deal anymore. Instead of it being out of the ordinary, it's become the norm - put in 8+ hrs a day. Everyday. All the time. If you put in your 8 hrs and no more, you're viewed as a slacker and not working - because everyone else is working 10 hr days.
    We're on the opposite trajectory in Europe. Hours are slowly getting shorter. Working more than 37 is rare, 35 is normal. Quite a few companies do 30. There's lots of research to indicate that this is actually more productive because any more and people do indeed quietly quit.
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    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I'm not sure that it is even possible to be productive for eight hours a day as a programmer. If you leaven in a bit of design, collaboration, and so on, then you can be productive for eight hours, but eight hours of programming isn't going to work very well. After about four hours, I feel that I am making as many problems as solutions. At that point, it's time to do something else.
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    The last time I was working as a full time programmer I spent a pretty good chunk of the day filling out TPS Reports and sitting captive in meetings with a multitude of "project managers" speaking in baby talk and answering their questions like "What is air?" and "What if God got into a fight with Superman?"

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    Re: Quietly quitting

    That's a common problem in Greece.
    We got the 8 hours (I'm on 8 , sometimes 9 sometimes 7). But I can justify it since in Greece you have to know "everything". So I'm doing programming,SQL,Reporting,Logistics,SAP,Web development,administration,user support,printer support, software support and talking to a couple of companies we are in par with from other countries. So yeah, 4-6 hours ain't gonna cope it. It's a sritty system and this strictly in private sector. In public sector, if you exclude ball scratching and jaywalking you might do a report or two per day...But mostly scathing.Fingers,rulers,forks, mystic hadoukens...
    ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ
    πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν·

  17. #17
    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    I've largely avoided being stuck into meetings all the time. They are sufficiently rare that I kind of look forward to them as a change of pace. That's a nice situation to be in. As a biologist, it was mostly reports and meetings. Nobody gets into the career for that, but once you get up the ladder a bit, that's all there is.
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  18. #18
    Super Moderator FunkyDexter's Avatar
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    The last time I was working as a full time programmer I spent a pretty good chunk of the day filling out TPS Reports and sitting captive in meetings with a multitude of "project managers" speaking in baby talk and answering their questions like "What is air?" and "What if God got into a fight with Superman?"
    Whatever you do, do NOT go into management. You'd frickin' hate it. It's actually what convinced me to step off that ladder and become a contractor instead.
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  19. #19
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    Re: Quietly quitting

    Been there, done that, got sidelined through a difficult personal tragedy. Never refuse a big promotion even if your parents both die unexpectedly, you go through a divorce, lose a kid, etc. that left you a bit... upset.


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