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Thread: Crescent Software archive...

  1. #1

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    Crescent Software archive...

    Here's something you folks might get a kick out of:
    http://annex.retroarchive.org/crescent/index.html

    All the old Crescent Software products for DOS, released to the public domain.

    If you've got any of their TurboBASIC products, please let me know. Ethan (original owner) doesn't have the TB products or ephemera any longer.

    tnx!

    g.

  2. #2
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    Re: Crescent Software archive...

    Quote Originally Posted by f15sim View Post
    Here's something you folks might get a kick out of:
    http://annex.retroarchive.org/crescent/index.html

    All the old Crescent Software products for DOS, released to the public domain.

    If you've got any of their TurboBASIC products, please let me know. Ethan (original owner) doesn't have the TB products or ephemera any longer.

    tnx!

    g.
    Nice. I love the retro look that site has. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
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    Re: Crescent Software archive...

    A quick trip down memory lane.
    I did have an early version of the Borland suite, with Turbo Basic, Turbo Pascal, Turbo C, Turbo Asm, but didn't do a lot of programming in any of those languages. I had a friend whose work use Turbo Basic, as it was initially much faster for screen updates compared to the Microsoft Basic compilers of the time. It pushed Microsoft to follow suit, and greatly improve their screen update routines as well, by directly updating the Video memory, rather than update it through the BIOS, which was what they were doing initially.

    As for Crescent software, Ethan Winer was on of the speakers in one of the meetings of a computer club meeting in the Washington DC area back in the late 80s. Of course he was promoting the use of add in libraries to enhance the implementation of programs using the QuickBasic compiler. Steve Balmer was there as well, and was talking about the latest BASIC compiler software, the PDS (Professional Development System), which was an enhanced version of the QuickBasic compiler, with additional tools. Steve also discussed a new BASIC compiler suite and IDE, which was still a bit of a secret at the time, but would be completely different from the QuickBasic DOS compilers and would support writing GUI applications in Windows. It would support the new Windows 3 OS that would soon be coming out. Of course he was talking about Visual Basic 1.0 releases, one for DOS and one for Windows, but this was still a couple of years before they were released.

    Since the PDS compiler was the latest thing in the Microsoft BASIC compiler world, Ethan Winer was working on a new version of his libraries to support the compiler. There was another similar library suite at the time, from Hammerly Computer Services in Laurel Md.
    I was comparing the two libraries at the time as they had a lot of similar capabilities, and I was debating about which one to buy. I had gotten the PDS compiler, and was waiting for both libraries to release versions for the compiler. I didn't realize at the time that Hammerly Computer Services was in Laurel, but since I lived in a neighborhood that was part of Laurel, I was walking down a street one day in town, and saw the main office sign and window for Hammerly. In the end, because they were local, and I thought I might possibly interact with them directly in the future, maybe some side work possibly, I ended up going with the ProBas Professional BASIC Programming Library, Vesion 2.0, when it became available, rather than the Crescent library.

    When Visual Studio came out, Ethan didn't make the transition, and returned to his "first love", composing and performing music. I downloaded a few of his songs over 12 years ago and feel a connection of a sort, as I've had a long time interest in music as well, although I've never attempted to pursue anything professionally, or too seriously publicly.

    Unfortunately, I never bought Ethan's libraries for Turbo Basic either, so can't help there.

    Coincidentally, I recently dug out my old PDS compiler floppies and installed the compiler in a DOS virtual machine (which I also installed Windows 3.1.1 and my VB3 compiler), so I could run some old software. In particular, a program I wrote using PDS which I couldn't get to run using the QuickBASIC compiler. For all that, I didn't end up using the libraries for PDS that much. When VB1 came out in 1991, I jumped on that bandwagon, and didn't look back, except for these nostalgia trips, for the most part.

  4. #4
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    Re: Crescent Software archive...

    I played around a bit with Turbo C and Turbo Pascal back in the day. I still have the disks for Turbo C++ as well as VBDos Professional and Quick Basic 4.5

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