dcsimg
Results 1 to 34 of 34

Thread: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

  1. #1

    Thread Starter
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    43

    Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Shaggy Hiker, I know how you came into your programming discipline.
    I am still in school as a CIS major and I've noticed that I most of the actual learning I've done has been from my own studies of books, videos, and making projects of my own. I can honestly say that the only thing that I've really had of value in the CIS field is programming logic and design.

    Does anyone else feel this way? Have you had the same experience? Am I just a nutball(yes), and way out in left field?

    Thanks for any input.
    I'm learning more and more each day. I just wish the stuff I knew stuck around a little longer.

    Learn how to make money online the honest way.
    Click on the link here.

    Learn how to make money online fast!

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    34,722

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    If you weren't a nutball, you wouldn't be coding.

    When I took an art class, they taught me how to use a brush, but they couldn't teach me how to paint...and I still can't.
    My usual boring signature: Nothing

  3. #3
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13,088

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I am self taught, I did take some classes once but it was mostly a waste of my time and money. They did teach a few things that were helpful, flowcharting and such but from a programming standpoint I did not really pickup anything at all.

  4. #4

    Thread Starter
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    43

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Quote Originally Posted by DataMiser View Post
    I am self taught, I did take some classes once but it was mostly a waste of my time and money. They did teach a few things that were helpful, flowcharting and such but from a programming standpoint I did not really pickup anything at all.
    So how did you get into programming? Do you do it as a hobby?
    I'm learning more and more each day. I just wish the stuff I knew stuck around a little longer.

    Learn how to make money online the honest way.
    Click on the link here.

    Learn how to make money online fast!

  5. #5
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13,088

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I started coding as a hobby just learning how to do different things, sold a couple of small programs for chump change then wrote a little game addin that I sold 100 or so copies of. Eventually I managed to get my foot in the door and land a programming Job. I worked there a little over 3 years then went into buisness for myself doing contract and support work for various companies which I have been doing now for 11 years.

  6. #6
    Fanatic Member namrekka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    639

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    There was no school in programming. I started in electronics. My first program was written via switches and tiny lamp bulbs...lol.
    And.....it was not very long agoo. Its going so fast.

    I think that is a problem nodays too. What you learn today is old school tomorrow.

  7. #7
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    20,922

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    School is meant to help give you the tools you need to learn specific topics on your own.

    Let's say you need to learn about some topic like WCF. For this you take a 4 or 5 day intensive course from a Microsoft certified instructor. This involves lecture, reading, hands on labs, and of course instructor assistance. Such a class is intensive but hardly complete. Then you go home and start reading and experimenting more because the course just gets your feet wet and it might have been taught using a a previous .Net/VS release.

    Then later you go take the next WCF course in the sequence, up to maybe 3 of them.

    This is not "education" per se, but another activity: skills training. And much of it is accomplished by doing.

    I think people somehow get these two things confused with each other a lot. A formal 4-year degree program isn't meant to provide skills training. But I've seen people without the background go into these short-course/bootcamp things and utterly founder. Often the culprit boiled down to poor reading and study skills combined with a lack of formal Computer Science background.


    I was in a Web Services class once that went into secure authentication, and the materials and instructor assumed people had a working knowledge of cryptograhic hashing and character encoding. Because half the class must have just wandered in off the street (both of these small subjects generated question after question). On Day 3 the instructor came back and offered them refunds to leave.

    Fundamentals and prerequsites are important. This isn't a kids' game.

  8. #8
    PowerPoster techgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    32,732

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I agree.... my mad coder skilz come from doing this all day every day. My KNOWLEDGE/Education comes from a mishmash of classes, reading, experimentation, conferences, and just simply keeping up (or trying to) with things.
    I can probably easily count the number of classes or courses I've taken over my life time on one hand
    Apple BASIC, Turtle Graphics (LOGO), C, AP comp sci (Pascal), SQL, -- ok, I forgot about the classes I took in Tech Training for the AF - Ada, COBOL, ASM, more SQL, and one or two more I'm sure I'm forgetting.

    Largely I find I do horrible in classroom settings when it comes to technical stuff. I tried to take a Lotus 1-2-3 class in college ... the wouldn't let me test out of it because it was a prerequisite for another class ... I lasted three days before I couldn't take it any more and left the class. That's one of the reasons I don't have a formal degree.

    -tg
    * I don't respond to private (PM) requests for help. It's not conducive to the general learning of others.*
    * I also don't respond to friend requests. Save a few bits and don't bother. I'll just end up rejecting anyways.*
    * How to get EFFECTIVE help: The Hitchhiker's Guide to Getting Help at VBF - Removing eels from your hovercraft *
    * How to Use Parameters * Create Disconnected ADO Recordset Clones * Set your VB6 ActiveX Compatibility * Get rid of those pesky VB Line Numbers * I swear I saved my data, where'd it run off to??? *

  9. #9
    Super Moderator FunkyDexter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    An obscure body in the SK system. The inhabitants call it Earth
    Posts
    7,502

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I can honestly say that the only thing that I've really had of value in the CIS field is programming logic and design.
    Don't dismiss them, they're more important than any syntax you will ever learn.

    I definitely learned more in my first three years in industry than I did during my degree but I think my degree has enabled me to get more out of my time in industry than I would have done without it. Thankfully my lecturers were more into teaching me how to program and why we make the decisions we make than they were into teaching me the difference between a Union and Union All. Because they taught me the 'whys' of programming I've been able to cope well with technologies and practices changing during my career.

    I also find myself mentoring other programmers as part of my job and I tend to notice a difference between formally educated programmers and those who are entirely self taught. The formally trained ones tend to be better. I mean no diss-respect to the self taught fraternity by this (I've worked with some excellent self-taught guys and some atrociously bad educated programmers) but the formal education definitely gives an edge, IMO.
    You can depend upon the Americans to do the right thing. But only after they have exhausted every other possibility - Winston Churchill

    Hadoop actually sounds more like the way they greet each other in Yorkshire - Inferrd

  10. #10
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13,088

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I would say that a formal education can give you an edge if you are the type of person who could pick it up without it and haven't already done so. Anyone can go to school but not just just anyone can pick up programing on thier own. It takes a lot to learn this stuff on your own and you really have to love it to last long enough to be good. Throw that type of person into a good class and they will learn a lot.

    In my case the biggest problem with the classes I took was that they were to slow paced and I had already been teaching myself before hand. Result was that I was more advanced than the other students. One day maybe 2 weeks in our instructor gave us a very simple little project to do and about 2 1/2 hours to complete it. I decided to jazz it up a bit and add a few more things to it due to the fact that we had over 2 hours and the project he gave I could do in 10 miutes or less.

    Anyway the instructor came to check on my progress about 30 minutes in so I ran my program for him to see. His response was "Why did you take this class? Most people in this class will not be able to do what you just did when they have completed the class."

  11. #11
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    20,922

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Lack of education leads people to do a lot of cargo-culting. They even struggle more with documentation since they have a hard time acquiring the proper vocabulary, which feeds back into their limited reading skills.

    Reading skills are so important to self-education that I am tremendously impressed at the progress non-native English language programmers make.

    I'm sure that over time more and more material relevant to programming will be translated to (or originally written in) other major languages too though. Globalization is driving programmer pay so low that a lot of the English-speaking world is turning away from the activity to better compensated less "portable" fields.

    Anybody know of a good deal on a septic tank truck?

    http://www.pumper.com/

  12. #12
    PowerPoster techgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    32,732

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    hmmm.... I'm not sure how to take that first paragraph... mostly because I don't know what "Cargo culting" means. I are not edumicated much. After all I only have a 2yr degree, and only because I gets me sum credits for on the job training in the Air Force.

    I do agree with the comment about reading being highly important to self-education. Because that's the only way I can absorb new things, I see something usually in passing, then I'll research it and read up on it later, try it out, figure out how to use it in practical daily use, and eventually it becomes part of my toolbag.

    If people are turning away from programming, I welcome that. SEriously. Means more opportunity for me. Because of what I do, and equally so, what the company I work for does, there's more to it than just tapping away at the keys. You have to understand the business as well. No amount of out sourcing will solve that problem. That's not to say we don't out source, we typically don't outsource the critical stuff.

    -tg
    * I don't respond to private (PM) requests for help. It's not conducive to the general learning of others.*
    * I also don't respond to friend requests. Save a few bits and don't bother. I'll just end up rejecting anyways.*
    * How to get EFFECTIVE help: The Hitchhiker's Guide to Getting Help at VBF - Removing eels from your hovercraft *
    * How to Use Parameters * Create Disconnected ADO Recordset Clones * Set your VB6 ActiveX Compatibility * Get rid of those pesky VB Line Numbers * I swear I saved my data, where'd it run off to??? *

  13. #13
    MS SQL Powerposter szlamany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    17,867

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I've had around 20 HS students come through my shop as programmers in the past decade.

    You can instantly tell the ones that "just have it". Someone who for some reason can handle a variable - and logic - and all that surrounds the nature of programming.

    I know when I was in HS back in the late 70's I was in awe of being able to program my Texas Instruments TI-60 calculator - which I still have on my desk today! Don't use it anymore - but it's kind of a symbol of where I came from.

    At any rate - some of those HS students (and even paid consultants) didn't have it. You could tell that they were book-learned on the subject - but simply didn't have the ability that some of the less-taught kids had.

    When I started in programming you had to have the internal initiative and enthusiasm to make a go at it.

    Now anyone who thinks they can handle a tech job goes to school - gets book-smart - and when out in the programming world simply never cuts it.

    I guess today there is a place for code-monkeys that simply take an assignment and make it happen code-wise without thinking of the architecting of the solution.

    Personally I want to always work with the people who "just have it" - collaborating on a project with people of this nature makes the whole project better. Having R&D meetings with "book-learned" wanna-be programmers ends up being more of a baby-sitting session where real ideas never materialize.

    *** Read the sticky in the DB forum about how to get your question answered quickly!! ***

    Please remember to rate posts! Rate any post you find helpful - even in old threads! Use the link to the left - "Rate this Post".

    Some Informative Links:
    [ SQL Rules to Live By ] [ Reserved SQL keywords ] [ When to use INDEX HINTS! ] [ Passing Multi-item Parameters to STORED PROCEDURES ]
    [ Solution to non-domain Windows Authentication ] [ Crazy things we do to shrink log files ] [ SQL 2005 Features ] [ Loading Pictures from DB ]

    MS MVP 2006, 2007, 2008

  14. #14
    Superbly Moderated NeedSomeAnswers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Manchester uk
    Posts
    2,604

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Did you learn your programming skills in school?
    going back to the original question, the only time a remember using a computer at School was to write my CV in my final year (at the age of around 15).

    After that i took computing classes at college and then did a degree, but i learnt far more once i started working then all my time studying.

    I suspect this is partly to do with the way that i learn best which is by example and by trying things rather than just reading. Different people learn differently.
    Please Mark your Thread "Resolved", if the query is solved & Rate those who have helped you



  15. #15
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    20,922

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    See http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/c/c...ogramming.html

    The usage has been around for a long, long time. I believe it predates Feynman's use by at least 2 decades though it saw a large resurgence when .Net came out, probably to tar VB programmers with.

  16. #16
    PowerPoster techgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    32,732

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Huh... new term to me... shotgun & voodoo programming I'm familiar with.

    -tg
    * I don't respond to private (PM) requests for help. It's not conducive to the general learning of others.*
    * I also don't respond to friend requests. Save a few bits and don't bother. I'll just end up rejecting anyways.*
    * How to get EFFECTIVE help: The Hitchhiker's Guide to Getting Help at VBF - Removing eels from your hovercraft *
    * How to Use Parameters * Create Disconnected ADO Recordset Clones * Set your VB6 ActiveX Compatibility * Get rid of those pesky VB Line Numbers * I swear I saved my data, where'd it run off to??? *

  17. #17
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13,088

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    New one to me as well.

    I have worked with both self taught and schooled programmers. The best I have worked with have been self taught. Some of which also had a degree but in a different area of study. The worst I have worked with have been schooled in programming mostly in other countires but one was educated here and had a Masters, yet was mabye the worst of all. The biggest problem being the reluctance to ask questions due to a superior than thou attitude related to education level. Many times I told this guy, look if you get stuck just ask there is a good chance that myself or one of the others have already ran into whatever issue you face and may be able to help you yet time after time he would waste 2-3 days before giving in and asking the question to which we usually had an answer already.

    Nothing against schooled programmers but the talent is in the programmer not the schooling. As my cousin always says "They do not teach common sense in school"

  18. #18
    MS SQL Powerposter szlamany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    17,867

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Quote Originally Posted by DataMiser View Post
    ...if you get stuck just ask there is a good chance that myself or one of the others have already ran into whatever issue you face and may be able to help you yet time after time he would waste 2-3 days before giving in and asking the question to which we usually had an answer already...
    This point is so, so true. Talk about not being a team player.

    When I have a group of programmers working on a project with me I like to point out that there really is only one correct way to do something in programming.

    Goal is to take A with B and arrive at C.

    Only one way to do this - imagine if you were coding in assembler - there would be only really one "least intrusive - least op-code" method to achieve said task.

    Just because we have gotten abstracted 2 dozen layers away from to op-code - there really is still only one solution.

    This is not coming from an arrogant POV - it's just what I feel is reality - IMO.

    My best teams have been where everyone knew this was an important "point" in my thinking and we all worked together to achieve best-practice.

    I've had so many programmers that spent the 3 days off on their own - what a huge waste for themselves, the team and the project.

    *** Read the sticky in the DB forum about how to get your question answered quickly!! ***

    Please remember to rate posts! Rate any post you find helpful - even in old threads! Use the link to the left - "Rate this Post".

    Some Informative Links:
    [ SQL Rules to Live By ] [ Reserved SQL keywords ] [ When to use INDEX HINTS! ] [ Passing Multi-item Parameters to STORED PROCEDURES ]
    [ Solution to non-domain Windows Authentication ] [ Crazy things we do to shrink log files ] [ SQL 2005 Features ] [ Loading Pictures from DB ]

    MS MVP 2006, 2007, 2008

  19. #19
    PowerPoster techgnome's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    32,732

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    There's a fine line between spending the time to figure it out yourself & deciding to ask for help... I've seen those that will battle it for three days before they ask for help. I've also seen those who will give up in 15 minutes. I fall somewhere in between, but I also work in an area of the system most people fear to tread, so I don't have anyone to fall back on in a lot of cases. Which has both sucked and been good. It sucks because I have to figure a lot of stuff out on my own, it's good because that area of the system is getting a big ol' rewrite from the core team this year, and so I'm given an opportunity to provide input so that the product not only gets better in the long run, but the things that are causing me grief now will be a thing of the past. It's a shame that the client I'm working with that's causing me the grief will never see this part of the new system. But that's another story all together.

    One way to combat those wandering coders, that seem to take a couple days to figure things out is to have daily meetings, call them scrum meetings, stand up, status, what ever you want, but the point is for everyone to get the chance to say "hey I'm having problem with A B & C" ... unless it's a whacked Twilight Zone kind of problem, odds are someone else knows something that will unlock the secret. Case in point, there was a question yesterday by a teammate regarding the GUID Creator tool in VS... it produces GUIDS in a variety of formats depending on your need. And the question came up of which one is best. I use the tool a lot, and so had long ago figured it out, so I was able to offer input on which one to use and what you need to do with the GUID once copied to the clipboard. OK, it's not like he spent 3 days on that, probably not even a half hours, but it saved some time just sharing that info, and now everyone on the team also knows.

    I think the reason some people will spend time spinning their wheels on things is that they don't want to appear incompetent. They were hired to do a job and they feel like they should be able to do it. Thing is part of that job is knowing when to ask questions.

    -tg
    * I don't respond to private (PM) requests for help. It's not conducive to the general learning of others.*
    * I also don't respond to friend requests. Save a few bits and don't bother. I'll just end up rejecting anyways.*
    * How to get EFFECTIVE help: The Hitchhiker's Guide to Getting Help at VBF - Removing eels from your hovercraft *
    * How to Use Parameters * Create Disconnected ADO Recordset Clones * Set your VB6 ActiveX Compatibility * Get rid of those pesky VB Line Numbers * I swear I saved my data, where'd it run off to??? *

  20. #20
    Super Moderator FunkyDexter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    An obscure body in the SK system. The inhabitants call it Earth
    Posts
    7,502

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Personally I want to always work with the people who "just have it"
    the talent is in the programmer not the schooling
    I agree with both of you on these points.

    For me education is just one advantage amongst a whole bunch others. It's a fairly small one too when you compare it to curiosity, imagination, an affinity for systems thinking, experience and having enough humility to know that they don't know everything yet... and never will . You can probably come up with a bunch of other examples I'd agree with as well. Education without curiosity is pretty close to useless. But, alongside those other virtues, it is still an advanatage and is therefore likely to lead to a better developer.

    I guess the argument, really, comes down to whether you think self taught guys have the more important virtues more commonly than educated guys or vice versa. It's about the tendancies of personality types. The OP's getting an education and he sounds pretty curious and talented so he should do well.

    I'd never come across the term cargo culting was a new one for me too but the phenomenon definitely isn't. The worst culture of this I've come across was in a company where they recruited their programmers almost exclusively through the support channel. I have nothing against programmers who've come through this route but the result of this particular policy was that the culture had become so insular that no new ideas and perspectives were being allowed to get in. The same bad habits were just going round and round because the support guys were learning by looking at the code that was already there. Large amounts of which had been floating round for close to a decade. Some of them had a bit of nouse when they started but a couple of years in support soon knocked that out of 'em. The whole thing was a maintenance knightmare. The daft thing was that recruiting from a more open market or just forking out for a bit of external training would have allowed them to start making their lives so much easier.

    And I've also met the guys who just won't ask questions. One of the things that surprises me is how few of the programmers I've worked with post questions on forums. Everyone gets answers from other people's threads but most go catatonic with fear at the thought of actually posting a question themselves. They hate the idea that they might appear foolish.
    You can depend upon the Americans to do the right thing. But only after they have exhausted every other possibility - Winston Churchill

    Hadoop actually sounds more like the way they greet each other in Yorkshire - Inferrd

  21. #21
    Super Moderator Shaggy Hiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Idaho
    Posts
    34,722

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Everybody lacks knowledge in some way on some thing, but most of us also have a certain amount of pride built up over the course of our experience. Asking questions is an admission of weakness in some environments. And then there are those other times....What I utterly hate is asking somebody for something when the answer was right in front of my eyes.

    In the summer of my youth, I had plenty of pride, and might not have asked questions. But now, as I get older, and the summer moves on towards winter.....well, you know the saying....pride goeth before the fall.

    If I can't age gracefully, I'm going to age disgracefully.
    My usual boring signature: Nothing

  22. #22
    MS SQL Powerposter szlamany's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    17,867

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    @shaggy - you taught me how to serialize a class two weeks ago. Trust me I had no pride coming to the forum and showing my lack of knowledge on a subject that I needed to conquer - that kind of collaboration with "really skilled" folk on this forum is why I participate here.

    *** Read the sticky in the DB forum about how to get your question answered quickly!! ***

    Please remember to rate posts! Rate any post you find helpful - even in old threads! Use the link to the left - "Rate this Post".

    Some Informative Links:
    [ SQL Rules to Live By ] [ Reserved SQL keywords ] [ When to use INDEX HINTS! ] [ Passing Multi-item Parameters to STORED PROCEDURES ]
    [ Solution to non-domain Windows Authentication ] [ Crazy things we do to shrink log files ] [ SQL 2005 Features ] [ Loading Pictures from DB ]

    MS MVP 2006, 2007, 2008

  23. #23
    Angel of Code Niya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,681

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I can say with absolute certainty that school is not really necessary to learn programming especially in the time of the internet. However, I would say that people who have had schooling on the subject may have certain advantages over people who are entirely self-taught like myself. I've not had a single formal class on anything related to programming. Its not a boast or anything, just showing that it is possible to be a competent programmer without formal training.

    However, as I said above a formally trained programmer will have certain advantages. One guy above said something about flow charts which I believe they teach you about in a programming class. Now, I've never planned out an application using flow charts but I can certainly see that it can really help with the development of software so it may stand that I've been writing programs all this time without utilizing a very helpful method that existed all along. I'm like a contractor that builds wooden houses in an earthquake zone without knowing that something called concrete exists. Now I can build one hell of a strong wooden house but imagine what I could have done if I had known about concrete.

    Sometimes when doing research, I often come upon concepts or a marriage of concepts that my lack of formal training makes difficult to grasp right away. The concepts behind compression for example. They often describe compression techniques using concepts and algorithms that seem like something they would teach you in a class room, I dont know for sure but it sure seems that way sometimes.

    All in all I would say there is great benefit in formal training but being a programmer is about a certain type of mindset and personality. You just have to "have it" you know ?

  24. #24
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    764

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    would you like a really advanced exercise to sharpen your programming skills ?
    if anyone says yes I'll post it here but it is really though

  25. #25
    Angel of Code Niya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,681

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Quote Originally Posted by moti barski View Post
    would you like a really advanced exercise to sharpen your programming skills ?
    if anyone says yes I'll post it here but it is really though
    I'll bite.....yes.

  26. #26
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    764

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    exercise : level EXTREME
    write a recursive function that :
    gets an integer
    and returns the level of the pascal triangle

    for example : enter 4 and the function will return 1 4 6 4 1

  27. #27
    Angel of Code Niya's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,681

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Ok, I have no idea what a pascal triangle is lol.

  28. #28
    Fanatic Member namrekka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    639

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I'm sorry moti but I don't agree.
    Does it make you a programmer of the year when you solve this in 5 mins? I don't think so. Most dive into details to deep.
    A good programmer thinks on a higher level and those details doesn't bother him. Those detailed problems you can find in a book or on Internet. Its the overall view of a project that is the problem.
    If you want to build a house its not the nails and bricks but the construction that makes an constructor.

  29. #29
    Lively Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    90

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I'm not the brightest candle on the cake. When the man up stairs was passing out coding gifts, I must have gotten in the wrong line or something. One thing I do have is dedication and the will to not give up, even if it takes days for me to figure something out. Most of all my code is pretty ghetto, but I have allot of fun with this stuff.

    Most of all I can't thank the guys enough that spend hours and hours of their own free time helping guys like myself.

    Pat

  30. #30
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Virginia
    Posts
    13,088

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    I had never even heard of pascals triangle but I did look it up and it actually looks pretty simple. I have no desire to waste my time on coding this but I certianly would not classify this challenge as Extreme level, intermediate perhaps advanced but I don't see it being any higher.

  31. #31
    Banned
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    764

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    @namrekka
    I partly agree with you, I think a good programmer needs to consider micro and macro, and by good I mean high leveled.

  32. #32
    PowerPoster
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    20,922

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Quote Originally Posted by PatnLongBeach View Post
    Most of all my code is pretty ghetto, but I have allot of fun with this stuff.
    No, no, we're on the verge of Windows 8.

    We say Metro now, not ghetto.


    Off on a slight tangeant, but those involved in this thread might be interested in reading How to Hire a Programmer.

  33. #33
    Karen Payne MVP kareninstructor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    6,515

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    Just because someone has a piano does not make them a master of the piano. Same goes for any development tool. There has always been and always will be those who do not take the time to hone their craft while others are continually honing their craft. I will openly admit that at least for me a two day class or a week long class is not for me, instead I need to concentrate and focus more on things and explore different directions rather than take a straight and narrow path of a single instructor.


    Shaggy Hiker
    Everybody lacks knowledge in some way on some thing, but most of us also have a certain amount of pride built up over the course of our experience. Asking questions is an admission of weakness in some environments. And then there are those other times....What I utterly hate is asking somebody for something when the answer was right in front of my eyes.

  34. #34
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    23

    Re: Did you learn your programming skills in school?

    As for me, no, I've not be taught at school on programming. That's probably because I'm still in the middle of high school. I still have to take Communications Technology before I can get into any real sort of 'coding'.
    I can program in Visual Basic 6/.NET. I'm Canadian.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Featured


Click Here to Expand Forum to Full Width