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Thread: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

  1. #1

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    Let me in .. techyspecy's Avatar
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    VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Geez, Its been a pain in the freakin ass to get application path in .NET. Here you go buddy's

    VB Code:
    1. Private Function GetAppPath() As String
    2.         Dim l_intCharPos As Integer = 0, l_intReturnPos As Integer
    3.         Dim l_strAppPath As String
    4.  
    5.         l_strAppPath = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location()
    6.  
    7.         While (1)
    8.             l_intCharPos = InStr(l_intCharPos + 1, l_strAppPath, "\", CompareMethod.Text)
    9.             If l_intCharPos = 0 Then
    10.                 If Right(Mid(l_strAppPath, 1, l_intReturnPos), 1) <> "\" Then
    11.                     Return Mid(l_strAppPath, 1, l_intReturnPos) & "\"
    12.                 Else
    13.                     Return Mid(l_strAppPath, 1, l_intReturnPos)
    14.                 End If
    15.                 Exit Function
    16.             End If
    17.             l_intReturnPos = l_intCharPos
    18.         End While
    19.     End Function
    Last edited by techyspecy; May 12th, 2003 at 05:47 PM.

  2. #2
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    You Rule!

    Good work!!! Is there anything I miss if I do it like this:

    VB Code:
    1. Private Function GetAppPath() As String
    2.         Dim i As Integer
    3.         Dim strAppPath As String
    4.         strAppPath = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location()
    5.         i = strAppPath.Length - 1
    6.         Do Until strAppPath.Substring(i, 1) = "\"
    7.             i = i - 1
    8.         Loop
    9.         strAppPath = strAppPath.Substring(0, i)
    10.         Return strAppPath
    11. End Function

  3. #3
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    You should use System.IO.Path to strip the filename from the path...e.g.

    VB Code:
    1. Return System.IO.Path.GetDirectory(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location())

  4. #4
    Fanatic Member Redth's Avatar
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    This seems to work too, however there might be something improper about it, if there is something wrong with it, I'd like to hear why it shouldn't be done this way, but here it is:

    VB Code:
    1. AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory

  5. #5
    Frenzied Member vbgladiator's Avatar
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    Application.StartupPath() also seems to do the job.
    Don't anthropomorphize computers -- they hate it

  6. #6
    l33t! MrPolite's Avatar
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    Originally posted by vbgladiator
    Application.StartupPath() also seems to do the job.
    just wanted to say that is what I also use all the time (since it's the simplest of all). I don't know if it makes a big difference, but all these methods seem to work fine. so why not pick application.startuppath? it's just the most straightforward of all
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  7. #7
    PowerPoster hellswraith's Avatar
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    Agreed. It seems like people make this harder than what it is. Application.StartupPath works perfectly for me also.

  8. #8
    New Member Sisyphus's Avatar
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    VB Code:
    1. dim AppPath as string
    2. AppPath = Environment.CurrentDirectory()
    that also works smoothly.
    Thanks to all

  9. #9
    l33t! MrPolite's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Sisyphus
    VB Code:
    1. dim AppPath as string
    2. AppPath = Environment.CurrentDirectory()
    that also works smoothly.
    noooooooooo I dont think it's a good idea to use that. I think that currentDirectory can change while your app is running
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  10. #10
    Hyperactive Member Libero's Avatar
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    Hoho, try this.
    VB Code:
    1. MsgBox(CurDir)
    And if you are going to pen a file in your apppath.
    VB Code:
    1. Dim file As New System.IO.StreamReader("test.txt")
    2.         TextBox1.Text = file.ReadToEnd()
    3.         file.Close()

  11. #11
    l33t! MrPolite's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Libero
    Hoho, try this.
    VB Code:
    1. MsgBox(CurDir)
    And if you are going to pen a file in your apppath.
    VB Code:
    1. Dim file As New System.IO.StreamReader("test.txt")
    2.         TextBox1.Text = file.ReadToEnd()
    3.         file.Close()
    your second method won't always work if I'm not mistaken (because current directory can change )
    plus CurDir is a VB compatibility thing, better not to use it
    rate my posts if they help ya!
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  12. #12
    New Member vbjay's Avatar
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    Also try creating a shortcut to your exe and set the start in property to some other path.

    Use application.startuppath.

  13. #13
    Hyperactive Member Dasiths's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Hi,
    I dunno about vb.net but in vb6 app.exename can change in windows xp if you start the program using the shell with the short directory name.

    I use GetSetting(app.exename,..)

    it changes when i use the short pathname to launch my program.
    It is the mark of an instructed mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits, and not to seek exactness when only an approximation of the truth is possible.
    -Aristotle As quoted in Rapid Development, chapter 8, page 167.

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    This C# function can be useful in a library for implementation of a MVC pattern or anything else.
    Traduction to VB is simple.
    Assert line is optional.

    Code:
    /// <summary>
    /// Get the current path of the executing assembly.
    /// ex : If this function currently executed in this library "C:\MyProgram\MyLibrary.dll",
    /// this function will return "C:\MyProgram\"
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private static string GetExecutingAssemblyDirectory()
    {
    
          string currentAssembly = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location; // Get current assembly with filename
          int nbCharToKeep = currentAssembly.Length;                         // Initialize length
    
          // Decrease length until an escape caracter is found
          while (currentAssembly[nbCharToKeep - 1] != '\\')
          {
               nbCharToKeep--;
               System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(nbCharToKeep >= 0, "GetExecutingAssemblyDirectory() - nbCharToKeep < 0");
          }
    
          // Return the dir including the last escape
          return currentAssembly.Substring(0, nbCharToKeep);
    
    }

  15. #15
    PowerPoster JuggaloBrotha's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    this whole thread can be replaced with one line:
    Application.StartupPath

  16. #16
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    Exclamation Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Microsoft says :
    Application.StartupPath Property
    Gets the path for the executable file that started the application, not including the executable name.
    So, this only works if your library is in the same application path. To avoid coupling a library with a particular application file, I do not recommand to use it in a dll.


  17. #17
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Code:
    My.Application.Info.DirectoryPath
    works for me in VB 2008

  18. #18
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by vbgladiator View Post
    Application.StartupPath() also seems to do the job.
    This doesn't work if the application is an ActiveX server being called by a client such as Excel. Then it returns the path to the client application instead.

  19. #19
    PowerPoster JuggaloBrotha's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by Kallog View Post
    This doesn't work if the application is an ActiveX server being called by a client such as Excel. Then it returns the path to the client application instead.
    An ActiveX DLL is just a regular .Net DLL that has an Interface that wraps it for COM objects. To get the DLL's path it looks like you can use: AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory, but if you need the word/excel/whatever path, I think you'll have to have a method or property that the COM object can set, your DLL & .Net wont know where it is unless it's told (passed in manually) where it is.
    Last edited by JuggaloBrotha; Feb 25th, 2010 at 01:38 PM.

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by JuggaloBrotha View Post
    Then it's not a .Net app and thus has nothing to do with this vb.net codebank
    Huh? I did that with Visual Basic 2008 Express which can create OLE Automation servers. If it wasn't a .Net app I wouldn't be able to call the .Net function Application.StartupPath().

    Anyway I found the other common reply:
    Code:
    System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location())
    to correctly give the application exe's directory even when called through COM/ActiveX/OLE automation/whatever you call it.

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by JuggaloBrotha View Post
    Then it's not a .Net app and thus has nothing to do with this vb.net codebank
    Feel free to apologize for your offensively worded mistake.

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    I'm a relative Visual Studio/VB .net newbie, though experienced in other languages and technologies. This is an interesting thread, not least because of all the effort put in so far that still doesn't answer my particular question.

    I am writing a VB .NET web application in visual studio 2008. I want to execute an external program to perform a function for the user, so I need to put the executable somewhere that is independent of its installation machine and accessible by my code. It would seem to make sense to put it in the same place as the EXE and DLL files containing the web application, but I don't know how to access it after that.

    Many of the answers given in this thread and other places so far don't seem to fit my environment. If I type "My." into my Visual Studio editor, for instance, it gives me Computer and User, but not Application, as options, so I gather I cannot use My.Application for anything.

    Likewise, if I type "Application.s" into the editor, it gives me "Set" and "StaticObjects" as options, but no "Startup" or "Startup()".

    Environment.CurrentDirectory gives C:\Windows\system32 at runtime in my development environment; that's not it.


    System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location() gives C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Temp\Temporary ASP.NET Files\root\fe508d91\60a8c65a\assembly\dl3\b72b7ebd\60f25a6c_b1c2ca01\WebApplication2.DLL at runtime, so that's not it either.

    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory gives C:\Users\username\Documents\Visual Studio 2008\Projects\WebApplication2\WebApplication2\ at runtime in my development environment, and that seems to hold the most promise. Is this one right? If I use that, can I (somehow) package my little executable with my web application and run it from that directory? And if the answer to that is yes, is there some magic to putting that executable in that directory?

    It is extraordinary that it takes this much effort to find this out. Why does my Big Fat Visual Basic 2008 book explicitly say that I can use My.Application, but Intellisense in Visual Studio 2008 doesn't recognize it?

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by rcook View Post
    System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location() gives C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Temp\Temporary ASP.NET Files\root\fe508d91\60a8c65a\assembly\dl3\b72b7ebd\60f25a6c_b1c2ca01\WebApplication2.DLL at runtime, so that's not it either.
    It looks like that dll is your program yea? I don't have a clue about web applications, but however you got WebApplication2.dll into that folder, can't you do the same thing to put the .exe there too?


    Quote Originally Posted by rcook View Post
    It is extraordinary that it takes this much effort to find this out. Why does my Big Fat Visual Basic 2008 book explicitly say that I can use My.Application, but Intellisense in Visual Studio 2008 doesn't recognize it?
    It may need a reference to be added. Type in the my.application call and use the mouseover dropdown box of 'error correction options'.

  24. #24
    PowerPoster JuggaloBrotha's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by rcook View Post
    I'm a relative Visual Studio/VB .net newbie, though experienced in other languages and technologies. This is an interesting thread, not least because of all the effort put in so far that still doesn't answer my particular question.

    I am writing a VB .NET web application in visual studio 2008. I want to execute an external program to perform a function for the user, so I need to put the executable somewhere that is independent of its installation machine and accessible by my code. It would seem to make sense to put it in the same place as the EXE and DLL files containing the web application, but I don't know how to access it after that.

    Many of the answers given in this thread and other places so far don't seem to fit my environment. If I type "My." into my Visual Studio editor, for instance, it gives me Computer and User, but not Application, as options, so I gather I cannot use My.Application for anything.

    Likewise, if I type "Application.s" into the editor, it gives me "Set" and "StaticObjects" as options, but no "Startup" or "Startup()".

    Environment.CurrentDirectory gives C:\Windows\system32 at runtime in my development environment; that's not it.


    System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly.Location() gives C:\Users\username\AppData\Local\Temp\Temporary ASP.NET Files\root\fe508d91\60a8c65a\assembly\dl3\b72b7ebd\60f25a6c_b1c2ca01\WebApplication2.DLL at runtime, so that's not it either.

    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory gives C:\Users\username\Documents\Visual Studio 2008\Projects\WebApplication2\WebApplication2\ at runtime in my development environment, and that seems to hold the most promise. Is this one right? If I use that, can I (somehow) package my little executable with my web application and run it from that directory? And if the answer to that is yes, is there some magic to putting that executable in that directory?

    It is extraordinary that it takes this much effort to find this out. Why does my Big Fat Visual Basic 2008 book explicitly say that I can use My.Application, but Intellisense in Visual Studio 2008 doesn't recognize it?
    WebApp's don't have access to the local system like WinForm's apps do. This is why you don't have an Application.StartupPath, because if you did, it's the location on the web server, not the person's local machine who's viewing your site in their web browser. When you're developing the webapp AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory returns the path to the project on your local computer because your computer is the web server, all be it a fake one, but one nonetheless. Once you upload the site to the web server, you're going to get the root path of where it is on the file system of the server.

    What you can do is make an old school activex control that the user can download from your site (they will be prompted before hand, there's no way around that) that can interact with the local computer, it's how Microsoft does it for WinXP's Windows/Microsoft Updates. How you would go about doing this is beyond me as I've never made an activex browser control before.

  25. #25
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Here's a toughy for ya. my executable is in a folder on a network drive. My R: drive is mapped to a folder a few levels above that folder. when i use ANY of these methods I get this:
    "R:\whatever\whateversub\myfolder\my.exe"
    thats not what i want. i want the actual path like this:
    "\\first\second\third\whatever\whateversub\myfolder\my.exe"

    can anyone figure this one out for me?
    please and thanks!

    -JeZteR

  26. #26
    PowerPoster JuggaloBrotha's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    When you map a network drive you get a path that has a local drive letter in your "My Computer" and when you use anything through that then that's the path you have, which is also the path your program has too. What you can do is make a network shortcut to "\\first\second\third\whatever\whateversub\myfolder\my.exe" in your "Network Neighborhood" or the desktop (which works like a folder/file shortcut except it has the \\first part included in it) and the program will have/know the same path too.

  27. #27
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    so theres no GetFullPath or GetActualPath that i could pass a mapped drive or folder to? that sux lol

    ok thanks for the reply

    -JeZteR

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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by jeztericp View Post
    so theres no GetFullPath or GetActualPath that i could pass a mapped drive or folder to? that sux lol

    ok thanks for the reply

    -JeZteR
    A network path isn't really more "full" or "actual" than a local one. It's just different. Here's a code that I think finds the network location of a local drive letter.

    http://www.mvps.org/access/api/api0003.htm

    So you'd find the local path, then convert the drive letter to the network path.

  29. #29
    Pro Grammar chris128's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Here's a much simpler example that I wrote that gets the UNC path that a network drive maps to - it uses the same API as that example in the previous post but I think you will agree it is much more readable and .NET friendly http://cjwdev.wordpress.com/2009/12/...network-drive/
    My free .NET Windows API library (Version 2.2 Released 12/06/2011)

    Blog: cjwdev.wordpress.com
    Web: www.cjwdev.co.uk


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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Bloody jesus it is :P But I wonder why there isn't a .net function for that.

  31. #31
    PowerPoster JuggaloBrotha's Avatar
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    Quote Originally Posted by chris128 View Post
    Here's a much simpler example that I wrote that gets the UNC path that a network drive maps to - it uses the same API as that example in the previous post but I think you will agree it is much more readable and .NET friendly http://cjwdev.wordpress.com/2009/12/...network-drive/
    Now that, is neat. I've wondered from time to time how windows knows a mapped drive vs a local drive, I've just never looked into it.

  32. #32
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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    haha thanks hope its useful to someone
    My free .NET Windows API library (Version 2.2 Released 12/06/2011)

    Blog: cjwdev.wordpress.com
    Web: www.cjwdev.co.uk


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    Re: VB.NET - Correct method for app.path

    I was really hoping I wouldn't have to use the old stuff(api). I really was hoping there was a .net way to do it. I have found that they have "forgotten" to include several things in .net that you could do in vb6.

    This will definitely work for now. Thank you all very much.

    -JeZteR

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